01 4 / 2013

KEN GARLAND-
Visual Metaphors
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KEN GARLAND-

Visual Metaphors

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01 4 / 2013

KEN GARLAND-

Visual Metaphors

…………………………………

Ken Garland started the lecture with a picture on his slide show of a pebble he had received from a former student. He asked us to keep in mind what we thought the pebble represented and would be told at the end of the lecture the intended visual metaphors we should get form this. (the pebble was white and had faces carved into a section of it (I can’t find a image of it)

A clip of the film ‘Citizen Kane’ was shown. Ken told us to pay close attention as he would play the end of the film at the end of the lecture to sum up.


Ken showed a series of pictures that hold visual metaphors. An image i found particularly interesting was the third image by Wilton Dipditch. The image shows the coronation of Richard II 1977- (see image 1)

In the image all the angels are wearing a ‘Hert’ broach. (BRANDING)

Ken said this was a metaphor for the dominance and good expectations of richard II. This was a start of corporatist identity.

The next image was also an important part of the lecture. The image was the diagram of a slave ship.-(see image 2)

The image shows how the slaves would be transported within the ship. The designer had to fit a 454 slaves into the ship, but no matter how many conversions he made to fit the slaves in, (all even lying down, touching sides) he could only fit 450 slaves into the diagram. This was said to be apt because on the way more than half of the slaves would die anyway and so make room for the other four. The diagram is used an unemotional device, and allows the viewer to look upon the issue in a different light and unemotionally, upon this disturbing image.

Ken went on the show many more film clips and images that he admired, which was interesting and at the end of the lecture came back to the ‘Citizen Kane’ film clip. The first film clip showed furniture being burned, the chair had on it an embroidery of a rose bud. The second film clip shows the character dying and his last words were ‘Rose bud’ this famous reference is supposed to be a metaphor for the mans childhood being destroyed, and this is the last thing that comes to mind as he dies.

Also now we were at the end of the lecture Ken came back to the pebble he showed at the beginning. the pebble was meant the represent black oppression by the white people.

Ken ended the lecture by saying metaphors can be non specific, metaphors may not mean to you what they mean to others.

01 4 / 2013

Image 1, (Ken Garland)
Coronation of Richard II

Image 1, (Ken Garland)

Coronation of Richard II

01 4 / 2013

Image 2 (ken Garland)
Diagram of slave ship by William Wilberforce

Image 2 (ken Garland)

Diagram of slave ship by William Wilberforce

05 3 / 2013

ARTIST LECTURE by-

Joe graduated in 2011, from LJMU the same year as Kat Easthope, for those who saw her talk last semester. After graduating, he moved to Berlin and then landed a job at the Adidas HQ.
 
Joe spoke about life after college, working abroad, the opportunities at Adidas, and his continued use of sketchbooks!
 
Although Joe Stodart was 1 hour late for the lecture I found in my heart to forgive him as he did travel from Berlin.  He also gave a really helpful interesting lecture about keeping sketchbooks, exploring ideas within them and using them professionally. 
 
The lecture was titles ‘Sketchture’- a lecture about sketchbooks.
He descibed sketch books as being-
'Wonderful time capsules of utter bollocks'
'Clinical organisers withour remorse'
'Dream and nightmare collection'
and a ‘Dissemination device’
(agreed, I think mine is all of them)

'How can we use sketchbooks'-
 

 
1. Reseach
- stick printouts into sketchbook to eaisily look back on.
2. Ideas
-Put all ideas in sketchbook and draw them out so you can see if they work as an idea or not instead of looking back on it and wasting your time by blocking your creative process.
- question and aswers with your self.
 
Quotes (about sketchbooks)-
'I think that it is an extention of your brain, as a storage space for unfinished ideas.'
 
'the difference between sketchbook work and finished work is instead of talking to yourself you speak to an audience.
 
The lecture made me enthusiastic about my sketchbooks and encourages to put them to full use to inporove my work.

ARTIST LECTURE by-
Joe graduated in 2011, from LJMU the same year as Kat Easthope, for those who saw her talk last semester. After graduating, he moved to Berlin and then landed a job at the Adidas HQ.
 
Joe spoke about life after college, working abroad, the opportunities at Adidas, and his continued use of sketchbooks!
 
Although Joe Stodart was 1 hour late for the lecture I found in my heart to forgive him as he did travel from Berlin.  He also gave a really helpful interesting lecture about keeping sketchbooks, exploring ideas within them and using them professionally. 
 
The lecture was titles ‘Sketchture’- a lecture about sketchbooks.
He descibed sketch books as being-
'Wonderful time capsules of utter bollocks'
'Clinical organisers withour remorse'
'Dream and nightmare collection'
and a ‘Dissemination device’
(agreed, I think mine is all of them)
'How can we use sketchbooks'-
 
 
1. Reseach
- stick printouts into sketchbook to eaisily look back on.
2. Ideas
-Put all ideas in sketchbook and draw them out so you can see if they work as an idea or not instead of looking back on it and wasting your time by blocking your creative process.
- question and aswers with your self.
 
Quotes (about sketchbooks)-
'I think that it is an extention of your brain, as a storage space for unfinished ideas.'
 
'the difference between sketchbook work and finished work is instead of talking to yourself you speak to an audience.
 
The lecture made me enthusiastic about my sketchbooks and encourages to put them to full use to inporove my work.

27 1 / 2013

Childhood Scenes, Boys

A lecture on her practice and William Kentridge.

Kate primarily from England, said she had worked in New york where she met her husband and then moved to Paris and started a family there.  This was an improtant step as this was when she said she properly started making work for herself.  Its obvious whithin kate’s work that her family are her main inspiration and subjects to draw.

Kate said she likes to work from life mainly and also by bad photographs that she takes.  She says this allows her drawings to be more free. She mainly works in print, such as Intaglio.  

From her presentation I liked her sketchbook drawings more than her prints. They were simple sketches but had a lovely quality to them which suited her child subjects.  I thought the prints with distorted lines and sometimes garish colours were too robust and look abit crude.

27 1 / 2013

Last monday the university held a life drawing class so I thought I’d attend as i hadnt done it in a while and it always inproves my drawing.

06 12 / 2012

A bit about him;

- He had studio called Intro.

- Started in 89’

- The studio he was working at was a leading UK music industry graphic design company.

- They worked on Identity jobs for labels.

- Later he moved away from being an ‘everyday designer’ and left his job.

- He now works at ‘Resident radio’ (an art radio station) as well as working independently and with his new business partner Tony Brook.

- Tony Brook and Adrian Shaughnessy set up their own publishing company, ‘Unit Editions’ so they were more free to create work they wanted and found no reason they couldn’t do everything themselves today because most books etc are advertised and sold on the web so there is no need to rely on book shops or publishers etc to get there work out there.

Adrian then spoke a bit about the work he had been involved in;

- Their first publication ‘Studio Culture’ (How to set up a perfect studio)

-‘TD8369’ (A book bout Dutch design)

- ‘Super Graphics’ (A 60’s graphics movement, painting onto architecture/multiple surfaces.)

-‘Lubalin’ (About Herb Lubalin Type and Graphic Designer.)

10 Things good graphic designers do;

10. Good designers are selfish bastards.

9. Verbal skills to match Visual skills.

8. Good designers stand up for what they believe in.

7. Good designers always think ‘What if?’.

6. Good designers are collaborators.

5. Good designers are ethical.

4. Good designers are copyists. (and modifiers)

3. Good designers know that the non-designing part of being a designer is as important as the designing.

2. Good designers are aesthetes first and foremost.

1. Good designers are outsiders.

www.uniteditions.com

01 12 / 2012

Adrian Shaughnessy

Adrian Shaughnessy

30 11 / 2012

just-art:

Illustrations by MΛRYNN

Pencil drawings with colour and texture added in, this is I think the direction my work needs to go.

(Source: just-art)